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In Memory

Dr. Murray Hodgson

Professor

Population and Public Health

Faculty of Applied Science, Faculty of Medicine

Dr. Hodgson was Professor of Acoustics in the School of Population and Public Health and in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. He was the Director of the Acoustics and Noise Research Group  and of the UBC NSERC CREATE Sustainable Building Science Program. Dr. Hodgson was a Chartered Engineer (CEng) with the UK Engineering Council and a Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America. Dr. Hodgson’s major professional expertise and research interests were in architectural and engineering acoustics, with particular interests in the acoustics of industrial workshops, classrooms and other workrooms, in computer room-prediction modeling, active and passive noise control, auralization, and in acoustical environments in sustainably-designed buildings. He taught acoustics and noise control to undergraduate and graduate students in engineering, physics and occupational and environmental health/hygiene. He was the author of over 100 refereed journal articles and 250 conference papers in acoustics.

Research Interests

Architectural and engineering acoustics, with particular interests in the acoustics of industrial workshops, classrooms and other workrooms, in computer room-prediction modeling, active and passive noise control, auralization, and in acoustical environments in sustainably-designed buildings.

Research Themes: 

The Communicating Mind and Body

Dr. Eric Vatikiotis-Bateson

Professor

Cognitive Systems, Linguistics

Faculty of Arts

Eric Vatikiotis-Bateson was the Director of the Communication Dynamics Lab in the Linguistics department, as well as the Director of the Cognitive Systems program. His interests were in the structure, organization, and function of communicative expression in any form, but particularly language and music. Eric’s research focused on quantitative analyses of the observable attributes of the production and perception of spoken and musical performance and on computing the ubiquitous, but time-varying, coordination that exists within and between interacting individuals and is necessary in establishing and maintaining perceptibly stable and meaningful patterns of behavior. Eric was also one of the developers and instructors of the new UBC course ‘Challenging Language Myths’ (English/Linguistics 140).

Research Themes: 

The Communicating Mind and Body